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Taipei City Fire Department

Reports

Yearbook2012

In hopes of creating a safer Taipei City for citizens’ peace of mind, the City Government continues to promote a variety of effective fire control and prevention mechanisms, conduct a wide array of disaster prevention awareness campaigns, and build a more robust disaster-readiness network to upgrade the City’s emergency rescue relief efforts, and refine its emergency first-aid skills and efficiency.

1. Fire Injury and Casualty Statistics

In 2012, 137 fire disasters broke out in Taipei City, resulting in 14 deaths and 9 injuries. Compared with statistics tallied from 2011, the number of fires dropped by 40 cases, the number of deaths rose by 13, and the number of casualties was down by 6.

2. Fire Safety

(1) Founding the Joint Public Safety Inspection Task Force of Taipei City

The Joint Public Safety Inspection Task Force spot-checked public security facilities in business establishments. Notices of failed inspection items – such as "Fire control" or "Building safety" – were posted at the establishments. A deadline was given to establishment owners to make improvements. In total, 1,059 establishments were spot-checked in 2012. Among these, 17 establishments failed to pass inspection for fire safety facilities. They were given a deadline to make improvements.

(2) Inspections on Fire Safety Facilities at Religious Establishments

The fire that broke out at Cixin Temple in Shilin on August 29, 2012 caused 6 deaths and 1 injury. Starting August 30 of the same year, inspections on fire safety facilities officially began. A total of 1,786 establishments received inspections. Authorities also promoted the installation of smoke detectors in residential housings for early detection of possible fires.

(3) Public Safety Management in Business Districts

On April 28, 2012, a fire broke out in the business district on Zhengzhou Road, claiming 3 lives and injuring 2. To prevent such tragedies from happening, fire safety inspections and fire prevention awareness campaigns were reinforced in 20 problem spots-where fires could easily spread to impede rescue. Also, in accordance with “Public Safety Inspections and Execution for Rescue-Challenged Old Business Districts in Taipei City,” road sections in Taipei City’s 20 business districts-where fire trucks can be accommodated for rescue-were designated and demarcated. In keeping with “Guiding Principles Governing the Demarcation of Space for Fire Trucks Maneuvering and Operation” -formulated by the Construction and Planning Agency of the Ministry of the Interior-advertisements, illegally constructed canopies, and booths in alleyways that could hinder the movement of fire trucks were investigated. These items were documented and reported to various competent agencies for follow up fines or punishments.

(4) Fire Safety Management at Medical Facilities

In light of the fire that broke out at the care facility-an annex to the Beimen Branch of Sinying Hospital in Tainan City-that claimed 13 lives and injured 57, fire safety inspections were conducted at the 39 hospitals, 19 care facilities, and 123 hospice facilities in Taipei City. Disaster prevention and rescue demonstrations were conducted on November 29 and December 26, 2012, at Zhishan Home for the Elderly, and the Renai Branch of Taipei City Hospital, respectively.

(5) Measures to Address Fires in Tunnels

In response to the fires that struck Xueshan Tunnel on May 7, 2012, the Taipei City Government formulated and promulgated “Public Safety Inspections of Public Facilities in Taipei City” to reinforce public safety facility inspections on underpasses, tunnels for vehicular traffic, the Taipei Metro and railway tunnels. The Taipei City Fire Department has listed 24 underpasses and tunnels as rescue-challenged areas for fires, and developed fire rescue programs and rescue drills. On August 17, “Disaster Readiness Drills for On-Land Traffic Accidents in Tunnels” inside Wenshan Tunnel were conducted.

(6) Related Measures for Taipei City Fire Prevention: Autonomous Legislation Promoted

A. To prevent wildfires and fires caused by the setoff of sky lanterns, setting wildfires in open spaces and the setting off of sky lanterns were outlawed on March 16, 2012.

B. Several laws were formulated and promulgated in 2012, including: Taipei City Inspection Guidelines of Lighting and Stereo Equipment in Bars or Clubs, Taipei City Fire Department Operation Guidelines of Regular Maintenance of Fire Safety Equipment in Specific Places, Taipei City Government Penalty Standards of Violation of Fire Prevention Autonomous Legislation, Taipei City Management Guidelines of High- Rise Building Disaster Prevention Center and Underground Building Administrative Office, and Taipei City Operation Guidelines of Public Safety Dynamic Training, so as to upgrade fire safety facilities in public venues and their overall readiness to ensure public safety.

3. Disaster Prevention and Rescue

(1) The Launch of Disaster Prevention Mobile APP

To enable citizens to access the latest updates on disaster outbreaks and rescue missions, an official website and an app for smart phones were installed to provide downloadable disaster prevention info, and related disaster prevention measures requiring public cooperation to minimize losses. Among these, the app for Android phones-including satellite cloud images, news on typhoons, disaster info, facts on accumulated rainfalls, water levels, images, evacuation information (including evacuation routes), location based information and information pushing/ sharing-was launched on June 14, 2012. The iOS version was launched 20 days later.

Mobile disaster prevention APP of Taipei City
Mobile disaster prevention APP of Taipei City

Disaster Prevention Handbook for Taipei City Citizens
Disaster Prevention Handbook for Taipei City Citizens

(2) Introducing the Disaster Prevention Handbook for Taipei City Citizens

The Disaster Prevention Handbook for Taipei City Citizens includes a variety of useful information, including disaster minimization, preparation, readiness, and post-disaster recovery and rebuilding. It is easy to understand and teaches citizens how to be prepared for earthquakes, typhoons, fires and other disasters in a step-by-step manner to strengthen disaster prevention awareness among the public.

(3) Disaster Prevention Campaigns and Drills

A. On January 7, 2012, “the 119 Expanded Disaster Prevention Campaign” was hosted at the Taipei Zoo. Themes of the campaign included, the Emergency Response Bag, the shelter park, an evacuation map, smoke detectors and fire alarms for residential complexes.

B. On March 2, 2012, “the Fire Prevention Campaign Truck-the Transformer” was

unveiled. The design of a custom-made, brand-new fire prevention campaign truck was inspired by popular transformers. A variety of fire extinguishing operations was simulated in a series of games. The truck is available to citizens, agencies, schools and companies interested in hosting their own disaster prevention campaigns.

C. Between May and December, 2012, 8 sessions of “CPR Training for the Public” were hosted at the Fire Safety Museum of the Taipei City Fire Department, with the participation of 403 individuals.

D. In July, 2012, 16 sessions of “Fire Prevention Camp for Youngsters and Toddlers” were held for elementary schools and kindergarteners over 6 years of age. 1,600 kids participated in the drills.

E. National Anti-Disaster Day

(A) On September 15, 2012, a disaster prevention education and awareness campaign was hosted at the 228 Peace Park. The campaign included stage performances, booths, disaster prevention rallies, and an open drill at the shelter park to heighten citizens’ disaster readiness.

(B) National Anti-Disaster Day was hosted at the Emergency Operations Center on September 21, 2012. Earthquakes and a follow-up nuclear disaster were simulated for the drills. The exercises were conducted simultaneously with those held at the Central Government via videoconferencing.

(C) At 9:21AM on September 21, 2012, earthquake evacuation drills were held for students under high school level.

(D) Between July and September, 2012, 4 Complex Disaster Prevention and Rescue Drills and 15 fire rescue drills were held to reinforce integrated disaster responsiveness of various departments at the City Government.

F. In response to the threat of possible large scale disasters, on March 28, the Taipei City Government combined the Joint 3-in-1 Briefing, and integrated hydraulics, geotechnical skills, public works, fire prevention, the police force, civil affairs, social works, medical services, environmental protection resources and national defense to host an intercity and inter-county Regional Disaster Prevention and Rescue Drill at the Emergency Operations Center and in the neighborhoods surrounding the self-autonomy rezoned district in Yucheng, Nangang District. For the first time, the drill combined the command post of the Central Emergency Operations Center to execute a joint disaster relief mission drill with 8 counties and cities in Northern Taiwan. U.S and Japanese expats living in the region were invited to join the sheltering and placement operations. The drill mobilized a total of 2,668 individuals and 286 vehicles of various sizes to strengthen mutual support and cooperation between the central and local administrations, effectively improve community disaster prevention programs, nurture the spirit of cooperation among different agencies, and boost the integrated disaster readiness of the region.

119 Expanded Disaster Prevention Campaign
119 Expanded Disaster Prevention Campaign

The exterior of the Fire Prevention Campaign Truck
The exterior of the Fire Prevention Campaign Truck

Complex Disaster Prevention and Rescue Drill
Complex Disaster Prevention and Rescue Drill

The Achievement Expo of the Disaster Prevention and Protection Project of Taipei City
The Achievement Expo of the Disaster Prevention and Protection Project of Taipei City

(4) Promoting Disaster Prevention And Protection Project of Taipei City

A study and an analysis of problem spots (areas susceptible to flooding, hillside collapses, and earthquakes) in Taipei City’s 12 administrative districts were conducted, followed by short-,mid- and long-term improvement measures and projects proposals. In 2012, a typhoon/flood prevention map for all 12 administrative districts (including boroughs in these districts) was completed. Also, on September 21 and November 16, “an Achievements Expo of Disaster Prevention and Protection Project” and “a Seminar on Disaster Prevention and Protection” were hosted at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology.

(5) Real-time Images at Disaster Sites

The Taipei City Fire Department houses 6 sets of disaster-site real-time image transmission systems. In the event of a disaster, 119 dispatches film and image transmission equipment to the site of the accident and sends feedback to the command center in order to keep the commander on top of the situation and enable him to make shrewd rescue decisions.

(6) Disaster Reporting on the 1999 Citizen Hotline

The Emergency Operations Center of Taipei City’s “Disaster Prevention and Rescue Support System” and the 1999 Citizen Hotline support each other in the reporting of disasters. The partnership has enhanced disaster information research (collection) capacity by 50%. At present, it is one of the most vital and indispensable disaster reporting channels of the city.

(7) Establishing a Mountain Accident Rescue Mechanism

The “Taipei City Fire Department Enhanced Mountain Rescue Plan” was formulated that integrates resources of the private sector, experts, and seasoned mountaineers to build a designated databank and coordinated liaison mechanism.

(8) Emergency Medical Services

A. The Number of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) Patients Successfully Discharged rose to 396 Since its establishment on June 1, 1999 through 2012, the Golden Phoenix Emergency Medical Service Team successfully revived a total of 396 Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) patients, and celebrated their discharge from the hospital. 45 such patients were rescued in 2012.

B. On December 8, 2012 the “Taipei City Ambulance Abuse Billing Plan” was implemented. 119 callers who request an ambulance to travel to non-medical service establishments, and who “fail” to visit the emergency room for injury inspections and registration will be asked to pay a service charge of NT$1,800 to cut down on resource abuse.

C. Strengthening Accident Reports of Patients of Cerebral Vascular Accident (strokes) to Enhance Treatment of Thrombosis. The Taipei City Fire Department and 8 designated emergency hospitals are now taking advantage of 119.

(9) International Exchange Activities

A. “The 10th Asian Crisis Management Conference” kicked off on June 13 and 14 in downtown Bangkok. The Conference focused on “crisis management experiences in big cities.” The Taipei City Fire Department presented a briefing on “Taipei City’s Disaster Prevention and Management Effectiveness.”

B. The professional competence of the Taipei City Urban Search and Rescue Team continues to win critical acclaim and recognition by experts in Japan. The team has been invited to take part in the annual “Comprehensive Disaster Training and Maneuvers” in Tokyo for 6 years in a row between 2007 and 2012.

The 10th Asian Crisis Management Conference
The 10th Asian Crisis Management Conference

Labor Safety Awareness Campaigns for “High-Temperature Outdoor Operation”
Labor Safety Awareness Campaigns for “High-Temperature Outdoor Operation”


Table 1 Emergency Operations Center in 2012 in Taipei City

DisasterResponse Time of Operation Disasters Reported in Taipei City
0612 Flood June 12, 07:30amto 23:30am 281 incidents were reported: a house collapsed at 1 location, power blackout at 6 locations, gas leaks at 2 locations, problematic water puddles on road surfaces at 52 locations, flooded houses at 42 locations, landslides (fallen rocks) were reported at 51 locations, road damages at 10 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 42 locations, 2 traffic signals were damaged, 17 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 1 location, 2 electrical wires (poles) were damaged, and 12 other types of incidents.
0616 Flood June 16, 14:45pmto June 17,07:00am 242 incidents were reported: power blackouts at 5 locations, problematic water puddles on road surfaces at 133 locations, flooded houses at 43 locations, landslides (fallen rocks) were reported at 20 locations, road damages at 11 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 2 locations, 8 traffic signals were damaged, 11 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 1 location, 2 electrical wires (poles) were damaged, and 6 other types of incidents.
Typhoon Talim (mild) June 19, 10:00am to June 21, 08:00am 146 incidents were reported: power blackouts at 11 locations, problematic water puddles at 7 locations, landslides (fallen rocks) were reported at 24 locations, road damage at 33 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 20 locations, 6 traffic signals were damaged, 37 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 2 locations, 4 electrical wires (poles) were damaged, and 2 other types of incidents.
0626 Flood June 26, 14:20pm to 16:30pm 2 incidents were reported: problematic water puddles at 2 locations.
Typhoon Saola(moderate) July 31, 11:00am to August 3, 09:00am
2,301 incidents were reported: 2 injuries, a house toppled down at 1 location, power blackouts at 116 locations, a gas leak at 1 location, problematic water puddles on road surfaces at 65 locations, flooded houses at 36 locations, landslides (fallen rocks) were reported at 59 locations, road damage at 73 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 1,229 locations, 104 traffic signals were damaged, 123 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 127 locations, 116 electrical wires (poles) were damaged, disrupted phone services at 4 locations, embankment damage at 4 locations, disrupted water supply services at 7 locations, and 234 other types of incidents.
Typhoon Tembin Typhoon Jelawat (severe)(moderate) First round: August 22, 08:00 to August 24, 09:00
Second round: August 27, 14:00pm to August 28, 15:00pm
152 incidents were reported: power blackouts at 6 locations, problematic water puddles on road surfaces at 3 locations, road damage at 24 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 16 locations, 20 traffic signals were damaged, 45 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 2 locations, 6 electrical wires (poles) were damaged, and 30 other types of incidents.
Typhoon Jelawat (severe)(moderate) September 27, 20:00pm to September 28, 13:00pm 19 incidents were reported: road damage at 2 locations, roadside trees toppled down at 2 locations, 5 traffic signals were damaged, 6 streetlamp failures, signage fell down at 1 location, and 3 other types of incidents.